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Keeping Current in Scholarly Communications

Scholarly communication is rapidly evolving as alternative publishing models become accepted, intellectual property issues are clarified, evaluative criteria for digital scholarship are developed, and as standards and conventions for accessing, approving, and preserving scholarship are stabilized. New laws, media, organizations, and conferences contribute to the lively interchange. Here are some places to go to stay current


Bibliography
  Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography. Charles W. Bailey, Jr. University of Houston Libraries, 1996-2005 <http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
    Regularly updated, this is the most comprehensive bibliography on scholarly communications available, covering economic issues, electronic books and texts, electronic serials, legal issues, library issues, new publishing models, publisher issues, repositories, e-prints, and open access issues.

Newsletters
  ARL: A Bimonthly Report on Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC <http://www.arl.org/newsltr/>
    "ARL is the bimonthly report on research library issues and actions from ARL (Association of Research Libraries), CNI (Coalition of Networked Information), and SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). ARL reports on current issues of interest to academic and research library administrators, staff, and users; higher education administrators and faculty; information technologists and those who depend on networked information; as well as anyone concerned with the future of scholarly communication or information policy developments."
  Issues in Scholarly Communication: a Newsletter for the Uiuc Community, ed. Paula Kaufman, University Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne <http://www.library.uiuc.edu/administration/scholarly_communication/>
    Summaries of top news stories related to scholarly communications and digital initiatives, with useful periodic overviews of major trends.
  Scholarly Communications Report: The Industry Newsletter <http://www.scrpublishing.com/>
    Subscription newsletter on trends in scholarly publishing aimed at publishers, information services, librarians, and scholarly communication communities.
     
     

Journals
  D-Lib Magazine <http://www.dlib.org/>
    D-Lib Magazine is a solely electronic publication with a primary focus on digital library research and development, including but not limited to new technologies, applications, and contextual social and economic issues.
  The Journal of Electronic Publishing <http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/>
    JEP publishes peer-reviewed articles from scholars and practitioners in the field of electronic publishing.
  Learned Publishing <http://www.alpsp.org.uk/journal.htm>
    Learned Publishing is the journal of the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers. Full text of articles in Learned Publishing is available online from volume 10 (1997) onwards.
  RLG DigiNews <http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=12081>
    RLG DigiNews is a bimonthly electronic newsletter that focuses on digitization and digital preservation. If you have a research collection that you are digitizing, you'll find this report indispensable for its articles on evolving practices and technology, new projects and publications, and events.
  The Seybold Report on Internet Publishing <http://www.seyboldreport.com/SRIP/about.html>
     
E-mail Lists
  SCHOLCOMM <http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlissues/scholarlycomm/scholcommdiscussion.htm>
    Sponsored by the Association of College & Research Libraries, SCHOLCOMM "SCHOLCOMM is a discussion group that provides a forum for the examination and analysis of topics such as open access to scholarly information, new models of scholarly publishing, increasing journal prices, copyright law and policy, related technologies, and federal information law and policies that impact the access of scholars, students, and the general public to scholarly information...This list serves an audience of librarians, researchers, scholars, policy makers, and all who have a vested interest in the sharing of scholarly communication."
   
     




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